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The group has been gathering at the university`s computer science department for the past week to tune in to YouTube for the online games, along with more than one million other viewers worldwide.

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In Edmonton, interest was more than scholastic, Dr. Mueller said. One of AlphaGo`s lead authors is David Silver, who earned his PhD under Dr. Mueller and Rich Sutton, another faculty member.

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  • Computer Games

    Those moves cannot be come to by brute-force computation, because with more possible board positions than atoms in deep space, the video game of Go is simply too huge an issue for a computer to take on that method.

  • Computer Games

    Those moves cannot be come to by brute-force computation, because with more possible board positions than atoms in deep space, the video game of Go is simply too huge an issue for a computer to take on that method.

  • Computer Games

    Those moves cannot be come to by brute-force computation, because with more possible board positions than atoms in deep space, the video game of Go is simply too huge an issue for a computer to take on that method.

  • Computer Games

    Those moves cannot be come to by brute-force computation, because with more possible board positions than atoms in deep space, the video game of Go is simply too huge an issue for a computer to take on that method.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crossing AI threshold, computer program conquers world`s most complex online game

 

In the current fight between human and machine, Martin Mueller can maybe be forgiven for his divided loyalties.A teacher of computer of science at the University of Alberta and an avid player of the ancient game of Go, Dr. Mueller has actually been following every move of the impressive match that ended on Tuesday and saw, for the very first time, a computer program beat the world`s best player at exactly what has often been described as the world s most complex video game.

Dr. Mueller was not one of those musing about the future of the human race as AlphaGo, the program established by Britain-based Google DeepMind, notched up its final win, taking 4 of 5 video games versus South Korea s Lee Sedol and claiming a $1-million (U.S.) cash prize while doing so.

For him, the more essential concern concerns the future of an entire field of research study now that among the holy grails of artificial intelligence has been claimed at last notably, by a group that was backed not by a university but by among the world s best-resourced technology business.

Are the most interesting issues in this location now only attackable if you have big facilities behind you? Dr. Mueller questioned after keeping upping the majority of Monday night, in addition to a small contingent of other department members and interested spectators, to take in a live webcast of Game 5 from Seoul.The group has been gathering at the university`s computer science department for the past week to tune in to YouTube for the online games, along with more than one million other viewers worldwide.

In Edmonton, interest was more than scholastic, Dr. Mueller said. One of AlphaGo`s lead authors is David Silver, who earned his PhD under Dr. Mueller and Rich Sutton, another faculty member.And in this case, it`s clear that the new Gretzkys of Go have pulled off something unmatched.It s certainly a milestone, stated Dr.

Sutton, a leader in a kind of computer programming known as support learning, which uses an experimental approach to improve efficiency. Together, they can work somewhat like nerve cells in the human brain to evaluate the state of an online game and pick the most promising next moves.

Those moves cannot be come to by brute-force computation, because with more possible board positions than atoms in deep space, the video game of Go is simply too huge an issue for a computer to take on that method.Using a 19-by-19 grid with black and white markers, the two challengers in an online game of Go are bound by a simple set of guidelines as they attempt to surround the most territory by the end of the online game.

But the many people methods which an online game can unfold suggest that remarkable gamers are those who perfectly understand which moves are more than likely to prove advantageous in the long run, a subtle ability that has actually thwarted computer programs for many years a lot longer than it needed to develop a device that could beat the world s top-ranked chess player, which was accomplished in 1997.

AlphaGo has managed to be the very first to cross the limit thanks to its double-barreled approach that includes both a learning neural network coupled with a sophisticated search technique. The program managed to sweep Mr. Sedol in the first three online games, securely demonstrating its power, in spite of his efforts to find creative methods around the attack.

He tried so many various things. Against any human something would have worked, but the program simply countered everything perfectly, Dr. Mueller said.

At their fourth conference, having currently lost the series, Mr. Sedol was free to play AlphaGo in a more bold style. He had the ability to identify an unlikely move that the program did not see, and it eventually won him the online game. But in the fifth game, which some professionals have actually evaluated the most hard-fought; the computer eventually prevailed once more.Dr. Sutton stated the stunning win signaled that it might be time for artificial intelligence (AI) to move beyond the realm of games into locations where conditions are far less idealized, such as controlling robotics that have to move and interact with the real world.

Dr. Mueller agreed that the air is getting thinner for researchers interested in building programs that can mimic human game-playing. However, he included, AlphaGo still count on studying human professional gamers to learn how to beat them. The next action will be to design a system that can teach itself the best ways to play and be a champion without any assistance.

And while it might seem like an esoteric accomplishment to the uninitiated, the success of such systems eventually bodes well for future applications in locations that involve intricate choice making of a more useful nature.

Chris Maddison, a graduate student at the University of Toronto and a member of the AlphaGo group, showed that optimism in an e-mail to The Globe and Mail, sent out as he boarded his flight back home from Seoul. With the aid of AI, we have the chance to deal with a few of humanity's greatest issues, he wrote.

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